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TheZooKeeper

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Thursday, April 13th 2006, 9:54pm

Breast is best??????????

It's v. early days to be thinking about it but I've been asked if I'm going to breast feed or bottle feed.

Apart from seeing how it goes and giving it a go what would you ladies recommend?

Bells

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Thursday, April 13th 2006, 10:09pm

There's no doubt at all that breast is indeed best, it's not the easiest option in the first few weeks but it's best in terms of nutrition for your baby.

Whether you will suceed with breastfeeding depends very much on your motivation and your reasons for wanting to feed. If you want to feed because the books say you should, your family and friends say you should, because you feel pressured to or because you think you ought to then you're not starting on a good foot.

If you want to feed because despite it being very hard work you want to give your baby the very best start in life and you are willing to put your life on hold for the first few weeks/months. If you understand the long term benefits and want those benefits for your child however tiring, exhausting and painful the first few weeks are then you are in the right position to succeed with breastfeeding.

If you're not bothered either way and are giving it a go half heartedly then unfortunately the statistics say that you wont continue to breastfeed.





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Friday, April 14th 2006, 8:56am

I stopped because of scar tissue and various lumps and bumps from my op, but if I hadn't had surgery I would have continued breastfeeding. But like Bells says its personal preference. I'd buy the bottles and sterilser as even if you breastfed you would need them later on anyway when you started expressing, give it a whirl and if its not for you don't do it!

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Friday, April 14th 2006, 9:43am

My intentions are to breast feed as the benefits for baby are huge. BUT if I find I can't do it or that it's too painful or distressing etc then I know bottle feeding won't actually do any harm.

A happy baby & a happy Mum are the main things & if I can achieve that by breast feeding then all well & good, if not then bottle feeding will be the answer.

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Friday, April 14th 2006, 11:56am

to be honest, knowing that breast really was best, and knowing that there are HUGE allergy issues on both my husband and my side of the families, and that my husband has a crap immune system I wanted to give my baby the best possible chance I could.

the knowledge really did help me perservere through some really tough times. the first 7 weeks were horrendous for me. but for now, so far so good and I am still BF at 10 weeks.

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Friday, April 14th 2006, 12:41pm

I think it really is personal choice. For me before jessica was born I thought I'd give breast feeding a go but if it didn't work so be it. Once here though I felt really strongly that I wanted to breastfeed her.

You have to be just prepared for the possibility that it could be very very painful for the first few days, very painful for the next fortnight and then painful/uncomfortable from thereon LOL. (But the BF counsellor does feel that I am one of the small minority of woman who have very sensitive nipples and will find it painful - other woman look at me dumb founded when I say its painful as for them its been fine!)

That said I have found it so worth it! its the most magical experience ever. I can't really put it into words but it just feels such a privilidge. Even at 3am and its agony you look into your baby's eyes and you just get this intense feeling of love (although I'm sure you probably get the same bottle feeding but without the pain LOL!). it also feels good having your body do what comes naturally - it just feels right somehow.

I've also found it quite convenient as you can whip your boob out in the middle of the night and just collapse back into bed when done (I don't think I've got the brains to measure out bottles!) and it gives you a great excuse to escape from relatives!


This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Primrose" (Apr 14th 2006, 12:47pm)


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Monday, April 24th 2006, 9:51pm

Quoted

Originally posted by Bells
Whether you will suceed with breastfeeding depends very much on your motivation and your reasons for wanting to feed.

If you're not bothered either way and are giving it a go half heartedly then unfortunately the statistics say that you wont continue to breastfeed.


Hi Jenny

I'm with Bells, Georgie and Sunshine on this - if you really want to do it, you really will persevere and make it happen. I felt strongly about it and refused to give up. After a few weeks, it does get easier, and I found it enjoyable by about 2-3 months. It's just that the time you have to make the decision is the difficult time.

Limpet
Had a total of three fresh IVF cycles and three frozen transfers (embryos and blastocysts)
m/c @ 11 weeks in 2007 DS1 and DS2 born from fresh IVF cycles :D
:D

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Tuesday, April 25th 2006, 10:17am

The World Health Organisation released something this week about the benefits of breast feeding and regarding obesity in later life I think - it was on the news.



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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 11:52am

am i a bad mother becuase i am planning to bottle feed ?

i will try the breats in the hospital and maybe at night - but i'd say most of my feeds will be formula.

There seems so much pressure to breast feed.







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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 12:09pm

ITs the one thing I really really want to do...Im not fussed about the birth experience (natural/assisted IM not fussed so long as its not too stressful for me or pip) but I REALLY want to breast feed....

Fortunately there are 9 lactation specialists at the hospital I'll be going into so Im hopefull that they will set me on the right road...its my biggest fear (once I have healthy bubs obviuosly) that I cant......but like Bells says hopefully if you are really committed it will work out...my mum couldnt because of absesses......

I truly believe however that it is down to personal choice...I wasnt breastfed and I am healthy and fit and until getting PG never had weight issues..the same for my brother who at the age of 47 is extremelly fit competing in national level mountain bike racing...he too had never suffered from weight issues. NOt breast feeding does NOT make you a bad mum...just like having an assisted birth does not make you a bad mum....its what is right for the individual..I really believe a happy mum makes a happy baby and a stressed mum makes a stressed baby.

xxx




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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 12:43pm

I did go in half hearted about it all i was determined to do at least a weeks worth of BF but I have found it very rewarding and not difficult infact I find it easier especially at night, no running up and down stairs warming bottles!

You just don't know till it happens what you will do I am now very adament that Mabel will be BF till she is at least 6 months old and this comes from a woman who really wasn't bothered either way all the while I was pg!

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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 12:54pm

kizzy- please don't feel under any pressure hun- the decision is totally yours. There is no point to bf if you are not 100% commited- it just won't work. you have to do what is right for you and your baby.

xx





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 12:57pm

i did b/f ds for about 3 months but found it very hard work.
i couldnt express either - so had no help.

i am not one for b/f in public either and dp wants an active part in the whole process so at the moment am swad more towords formula.







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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 1:12pm

I know I'm not really experienced in this field...yet ;) But do want to say to you Kizzy, that you are no way a bad mother if you formula feed

You are right in that there can be too much pressure on new mum's to BF. I do agree with health workers highlighting the benefits from it, and give as much help as humanly possibly in hospitals or home visits.. but it can become a bit too much for some mother's, and no doubt some women may feel awful if they give up after a while

If you can BF a baby for even just 1 week, that's great.

You raise a good point too, about your DP wanting to be involved right from the start. Often the fathers don't get to play such an active role in the beginning, so I do thoroughly understand this reason for using formula as well

Lisa
xxxx

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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 1:14pm

If you have had access to and considered all of the information then you have made an informed choice not to breastfeed.

I'm sure that Nikki, as a midwife, has come across lots of women who simply do not know of the health risks associated with bottle feeding and think that it is a simple choice as to which method more easily fits in with their lifestyle.

Therefore, positive information is made available to Mums but is often construed as pressure to breastfeed. The research is unanimous that it IS better to breastfeed because despite clever marketing, artificial milk is not as nutritionally good as breastmilk and cannot offer the same health benefits. As long as Mums know this then it is entirely their choice whether they choose to breastfeed or not.





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 2:44pm

Kizzy
Of course bottle feeding doesn't make you a bad mother. There are enough things to feel guilty about and struggle with when you have a new born without having that weighing on your mind as well. As Bells says breast milk is best for your baby but so is a calm mum and and involved dad. I would say if you're not totally against, then give it a go, you might find it a lot easier than last time. I have to admit a lot of my reasons for wanting to BF are selfish ones, like losing weight, reducing the risks of cancer, financial reasons, HAVING to sit down with the baby because no one else can etc...





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 3:20pm

I don't think that having Dad involved is a valid reason to feed artificial milk. There are plenty of other ways for Dads to get involved and Dads of breastfed babies bond just as well as Dads of bottle fed babies. The benefits of breastmilk outweigh the benefits gained from Dad being able to hold baby while he/she feeds.





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 4:21pm

Mrs J

Im shocked and appalled...youre always just thinking of me me me..no thought for little bubs at all....how selfish of you to try and give bubs the best possible start in life...take yourself outside and have a firm word with yourself young lady!!!


xxxx




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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 4:31pm

i will luv to breastfeed and try my best.
THANK GOD OUR FAMILY IS NOW COMPLETE
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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 4:32pm

Thats not entirely what I meant! I want to BF for bubs sake, but the advantages to me are very attractive, especially the fact that I get to eat LOADS!

PS: I love that you called me 'young lady' I haven't been called that in ages, unfortunately I'm no longer all that young and I don't think I've ever been a lady!




This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "mrsjasper" (May 22nd 2006, 4:33pm)


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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 5:04pm

Bells- yep you're right, i have come accross PLENTY of women who choose to bottlefeed simply as a lifestyle choice rather than an informed decsion based on the benefits or perceived "problems" associated with either method of feeding.
I am a passionate supporter of breastfeeding and have spent many hours working with women desperate to bf and seeing them succed is wonderful, awe inspiring stuff. the sight of a breastfeeding mother is just amazing.
However, i am also a firm believer in INFORMED choice, and if i will do everything to ensure that parents have all available information to make that choice. Furthermore, once a mother has decided to formula feed- it is imperative that appropriate advice is given regarding the importance of sterilizing and mixing feeds properly, as i have seen the odd health prof with the attitude of " well yuo're formala feeding now, get on with it"- a very dangerous attitude.





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 5:40pm

Mrs J


I was joking I hope you didnt take it the wrong way......I know you always put bubs first!!!


Of course you are young...we all are..esp ME!! As for being a lady...well unless youve got some meat and 2 veg stashed away somewhere secretive......(and we'd all be pretty freaked out if you have!!) then thats close enough to being a lady for me......

maybe we shuold call you Lady J from now on!!!!


xxxxx



This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "tinkerbell" (May 22nd 2006, 5:42pm)


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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 6:08pm

There may feel like a lot of pressure to bf but from what I've seen I'm very much in the minority as a bf mother. Most mothers I have come accross are bottle feeding so I suppose NHS people feel they have to push hard to reverse the trend? Almost all the mothers I know that bottle feed now wish they had stuck with bf.

From someone who found it agnosing at first, (even now its not painfree - but that is definately unusual) I still personally I can't speak highly enough of bf. Ok there are all the health benefits to mother and baby but I don't think that alone would have kept me purservering with it. I think its also the convenience - I now have no qualms about doing it in public, it really is no big deal, its a really easy way to instantly calm down DD if she is upset because of the 'happy' hormones breast milk contains (eg after her injections), I love the fact that she is lovely and lean (and not a big dollop like her mother LOL!) and above all I feel so close to my DD whilst bf it feels such a privilidge to be able to do it.



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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 6:43pm

Lots of health professionals bang on about the benefits of breastfeeding, which are indeed correct, I breastfed for 10 months and it was definately the right decision. The only thing I find is that when women have had the babies, the midwives are so run off their feet that they dont have the time or patience to sit with them and help to initiate feeding. I witness lots of mums who give up within a day because there is no support which is a shame. If you choose to breastfeed then dont feel scared to ask the midwives or midwifery assistants for help, no matter how long it takes. Thats what they are there for!

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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 6:45pm

Oh and poor attachment usually causes painful sore cracked nipples, so if youre supported in getting it right from the start then there shouldnt be any problems!

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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 8:27pm

Hi Girls

I haven't been on here since I had my son Jacob who is now 12 weeks old.

I had fantastic support in breast feeding from the midwives and breast feeding advisor and I could do it, HOWEVER, Jacob couldn't!

After lots of trying and tears it turned out that he had a stiff neck and could't position himself to latch on. No one told me that sometimes it's the baby that can't do it until I'd ended up an emotional wreck and in tears for days! I wish the health professionals had told me that some babies stuggle hence in years gone by high mortality rates.

I also wish they'd advised me to see the cranial oestopath who could've helped Jacob with his neck and sucking. I'm taking Jacob to the oesteopath and it's doing him so much good, he's straightening out and has stopped being very sick.

I was emotional for ages after stopping and found it to be like a bereavement, sounds dramatic but that's how I felt. I also felt when people asked if I was BF I felt awful saying no and promptly justified that actually I could do it but Jacob couldn't, poor fella, his Mum laying the blame at his feet!!

I cried when I gave him the first bottle and couldn't have anyone watch me, even my lovely husband, but when Jacob took it he looked so content and full I then felt awful that he'd been stressed and hungry.

I would advise to visit the cranial oesteopath if you suspect there's a problem and be kind to yourself whatever your decsion, I was mean to me and finally realied that Jacob hasn't judged me and he's thriving and happy.
Lara

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Six months Clomid.
Laparoscopy July 2004, Endo diagnosed.
IUI Nov 04, failed.
IVF April 05. Aandoned after E/C as overstimulated severely.
BFP natural cycle, July 05.
Jacob born 25.2.06, natural waterbirth with self hypnosis.


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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 8:32pm

Lara, very well done for giving it a go. I hope that the cranial osteopathy continues to work its magic for Jacob.

I can't remember who but one of the ladies on here has used a CO to great effect.





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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 8:44pm

Princess Pippy I think?

Lara where do you take Jacob is it in Ashford?

You poor thing I totally beat myself up when I gave Mabel a bottle because my nipples were so sore and milk wasn't ready to be expressed but like you say she was fine and full and happy, hope Jacob is ok now poor little mite!

I called Phil (NCT BF lady) and she really helped as Lononchilc mentioned it is all about positioning and making sure your nipple is right to the back of their mouths on the soft pallet.

I can actually get in the shower now without shreking in agony!

Lara

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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 8:58pm

Hi Lauren

Jacob see's a lovely man called Ivo in Tenterden. He thinks Jacob was stuck in me as his head was quite wonky and he'd only lay with his head one way, hence his troubles latching on.

I also saw Phil and she did help, but Jacob still couldn't latch on my right boob as he coudn't turn his head. He's doing really well and looks less wonky and sleeps with his head both sides now. Hooray for Ivo!

Card for you here, can't wait for a cuddle! I'm 5 mins away if you need somene to talk to.xx
Lara

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M/C Oct 2001
Six months Clomid.
Laparoscopy July 2004, Endo diagnosed.
IUI Nov 04, failed.
IVF April 05. Aandoned after E/C as overstimulated severely.
BFP natural cycle, July 05.
Jacob born 25.2.06, natural waterbirth with self hypnosis.


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Monday, May 22nd 2006, 9:44pm

Lara, It sounds like you really explored every avenue with Jacob and you sound like you were really upset when things didn't go to plan. Did anyone explain that baby shouldn't turn his head at all when latching on or during feeding? Or did anyone show you how to hold him in the 'rugby ball' position if he could feed from one side but not the other?





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Tuesday, May 23rd 2006, 1:53pm

I had lots of 'help' when trying to BF in hospital, in fact so many midwives & care assistants had hold of my boobs trying to get Nathan latched on I began to wonder if they were mine at all ;(

I found the staff encouraged breast feeding but didn't try to explain to me what I needed to do, just took a handful of nipple & shoved it in his mouth. I cried for ages because I couldn't feed my baby & felt I let him down. I did persevere & managed to get latched on on my own & since then things have clicked pretty well.

It's so easy to be disillusioned by trying to bf without the proper support & encouragement. Only once has a mw actually said to me I was doing a brilliant job - it makes all the difference in the world to a new mum. I just felt I was a feeding machine which didn't work properly, there was no compassion or sympathy from the staff who tried to help me.

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Tuesday, May 23rd 2006, 2:14pm

Hun, reading that makes me want to jump in my car, come round and give you a cuddle.

It really does make a difference to be told that "yes, you're doing really well". It's such a full time job and after only a couple of days it feels like you've spent at least a year with your boobs out.

There are so many on you here on these boards who are going through various stages of feeding, we all understand everything you're feeling so don't feel funny about coming on here for a word of support and a moan if things aren't going as well as you had hoped.

I feel really proud of you ladies who are persevering with breastfeeding, you're all doing amazingly well.





Lara

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Tuesday, May 23rd 2006, 8:56pm

Bells, I had loads of support, I had Jacob on the Saturday and didn't leave hospital till Wed trying to get Jacob to latch on. Had ALL the midwives on the bed with me and tried rugby ball, laying down etc.

They also thought part of the trouble was Jacob just couldn't open his mouth, even on bottles we had to get medium flow teats. They also teased me that my self hypnosis chilled him out too much, he never cried when he was hungry.

Still, as I say, he's happy and healthy, and so am I!!
Lara

Me 35
DH 31

TTC 4years.
M/C Oct 2001
Six months Clomid.
Laparoscopy July 2004, Endo diagnosed.
IUI Nov 04, failed.
IVF April 05. Aandoned after E/C as overstimulated severely.
BFP natural cycle, July 05.
Jacob born 25.2.06, natural waterbirth with self hypnosis.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Lara" (May 23rd 2006, 8:56pm)


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Wednesday, May 24th 2006, 7:24am

Lara - my DS spent his first 4 weeks swaddled so he looked like a slug and I just aimed his mouth directly at the nipple until he got big enough to open wide enough! he didnt turn his head at all at first. however, I AM pleased for you that you are now both happy and healthy. :))

Chili - I sooooo empathise about the shower. ;( It was 9 weeks until I had a shower without putting a hand over the boob that was getting sprayed with water! 8o

What made a huge difference for me is having DH and my GP totally committed to breast feeding without pressurising me - all support and no criticism. :]

I have to say, even now (at almost 4 months!) the latch on the flat nipples is still wince-inducing, I dislike expressing, I cant nurse in public (too shy and too squirmy a baby) and now that DS sees the world and arses around during daytime BF (which is yankingly painful), I cant say I really enjoy BF but I am determined to stick it through for at least 6 months - enough so that I am sorting my work out and taking vacation time to work reduced hours so that I can ensure that I am BFing my son. The poor little boy has really bad eczema (takes after his mum and dad poor lamb) and I am determined to give him the best chance possible.

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Wednesday, May 24th 2006, 1:19pm

i am returning to work after about 4 months so long term B/f is not an option really for me - of course i am judging this all on my past experience, having b/f feed for 3 months last time.

i couldnt express - it took a long time to get even the smallest amount, if i wasnt expressing then i was feeding.

I found DS wanted feeding every hour or 2 hours and promtly fell asleep as soon as he latched on.



i admire any mother that can B/f for any given amount time - albeit 1 month or 12 months and no one has the right to judge another way, in my opinion.






This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "kizzy" (May 24th 2006, 2:55pm)


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Wednesday, May 24th 2006, 1:49pm

Quoted

Originally posted by kizzy
i am returning to work after about 4 months so B/f is not an option really for me


?( I don't understand?

If you don't want to breastfeed then really, that's ok! ..... but if you want to then returning to work at 4 months isn't a problem at all. If expressing isn't for you, you could stop breastfeeding at 3 months and spend a month switching over to bottles.





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Wednesday, May 24th 2006, 2:43pm

i am going to try with B/f but then will prob do bottles in the day and bf at night.







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Wednesday, May 24th 2006, 4:41pm

Kizzy, I'm by no means trying to pressure you chuck, I know you're not keen on the idea at all but it's important to understand that combined feeding from the outset is rarely successful. I don't want to push you in a direction that you're not happy to go in and I hope that you won't construe my posts as pressure to do something that you're not happy doing.

I urge you to Google the words 'Mixed Feeding' and familiarise yourself with the methods and tips on how to succesfully combine breast and bottle.

x





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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 4:46am

Quoted

Originally posted by kizzy
i am returning to work after about 4 months so long term B/f is not an option really for me - of course i am judging this all on my past experience, having b/f feed for 3 months last time.

i couldnt express - it took a long time to get even the smallest amount, if i wasnt expressing then i was feeding.

I found DS wanted feeding every hour or 2 hours and promtly fell asleep as soon as he latched on.


kizzy - why not just give it a go at full time BF at the beginning and then if it still doesnt work, at least you can tell yourself you tried? thing is, I've been speaking to a lot of 2/3/4 time around mums at work and a lot of them gave up on BF with their first child within a few weeks but all of them without fail said that they didnt have the same problems with the second & onwards children.

also, as for expressing, I found it a nightmare to start with, but once my milk really came in, and I spent the money on an electric pump rather than a hand pump it is so much easier. I certainly cant say that I enjoy it, but it is doable.

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 4:59am

deleted cos it was a double post

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Sunshine" (May 25th 2006, 5:16am)


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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 8:17am

I'm exclusively breastfeeding Damson now after the first few days were extremely hit and miss.

I was taken into surgery within 45 minutes of her arriving to have the placenta removed (delightful James Herriot expereince) and in the 1 and half that I was away the midwives took it upoin themselves to feed her formula - i'm sure there was good reason but :(.

For the first few days after this she just wouldn't feed but we've perservered and its SLOWLY getting better. she tends to fuss at my nipple a lot and isn't great at latching on. she'll feed in short bursts of about 10 minutes, then stop and posset, then feed again for about 10 mins. she is suffering a lot with wind poor mite but she is gaining weight and the m/w is happy so so am i.

i've tried expressing but just couldn't one single drop out. i think i will invest in an electric pump if that makes a difference???







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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 8:41am

electric does make a difference, but so does time.

some ladies have great success almost instantly. it took me about 3 weeks before I started getting liquid out easily. remember, it also takes a few minutes (literally) of pumping before liquid comes out. sometimes it can take me 1 minute, other times 3 or 4 minutes of pumping before the flow starts.

maybe your DD had a small amount of jaundice? that might be why they fed her formula as it apparently can help flush the toxins & meconium out of her body more quickly than waiting for your milk to come in. very naughty of them though to do it without asking X(

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 8:50am

Bec - I was told to feed the baby & then try to express afterwards from the same boob. This way your milk should already have come down & you also help increase the amount of milk for your LO on the next feed.

On saying that I have tried to express with the electric pump after a feed & got very little out. I tried the other boob & managed to get about 1floz (whoo hoo!). You can buy medela electric pumps on E-bay, mine is a reconditioned one from a nursery stockist (it's parts are all new but the motor bit is used & the box was a little battered) for less than £15.

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 8:58am

natch, I have barely got anything out after a feed on the boob - even now!

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 9:19am

they didn't really give me any explanation, just that they thought she'd gone too long without food.

I'll wait a week or so before poss buying an electric pump. Got any advice on encouraging her to stay longer at the breast?







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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 11:10am

Sunshine - i will def be trying !
i have reaad lot of info and i think my disicision will be an informed one.

i did breast feed fully for 3 months last time - but found expressing preatically impossible so turned to formula - which i did find a lot easier in the sense that DS took drank a lot more and was keen to feed rather than sleep with latched on.

I am not one for feeding infront of people which also concerns me a little - but hey ho ! if needs must.

Thanks for the info Bells - i will reading up on mixed feeding, its an option for me.







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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 11:14am

bec - that's a piss poor excuse - if you had the energy I would seriously consider writing a complaint. whilst it's great for YOU to have the baby latch on to YOU almost immediately, you arent actually providing much food initially because it takes a few days for your milk to come in, so I cant understand their reasoning. X(

staying longer at the breast? tickle her cheeks, waggle her ears, pump her arm up & down.... dont worry you'll soon be asking for tips on how to keep her motionless at the breast! ;) :D

just go with the flow until she is a few weeks old :)

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 11:15am

Bec - one tip from my mw in hospital was to strip baby down to the nappy, if she is cooler supposedly they are more inclined to feed & less inclined to sleep :(

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 11:23am

kizzy - NIP (nursing in public) is really something I do as a last resort. I try and avoid it if at all possible.

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Thursday, May 25th 2006, 11:24am

Ladies who are wanting to express, don't beat yourself up about quality, quantity or ease for at LEAST three months.

So many women have their baby and a few days later wonder why they can't fill a bottle with milk. It's just not that easy...... lots of things need to 'click' into place before expressing becomes easy.

The advice for expressing is that you should first establish a good breastfeeding pattern before you so much as look at a breastpump and this can take several months. Your milk production, your confidence, your technique your let down reflex... they ALL need to sort themselves out before you try expressing. The mental or physical stimulation just isn't there for most people in those first few weeks after the birth of a first baby.

NOW....We know that not everyone has the luxury of three months to establish feeding and that lots of women need to express for one reason or another so just take the above into consideration and don't expect too much in those first few months. The other problem of course is that babies often don't like bottles after three months so to keep baby interested in bottles you only need to be offering a few drops of expressed milk.

Even after several months of confident breastfeeding there are times when there is barely enough spare milk to fill an eggcup. Breastmilk is so variable and your baby controls the stock levels and quality, not you. Your baby put the order in, takes delivery and you can pump what's left. It's not an indication of how much milk you make, it's an indication of how much milk is left over..... considering your body makes the correct amount for you baby then there's no failure at all in not having a lot to express.








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