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  • "Princess zoe" started this thread

Posts: 283

Reg: Feb 23rd 2008

Location: Preston

Children: Little boy called jack xx

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1

Friday, March 5th 2010, 3:35pm

advice needed about breast feeding/bottle feeding?

Hi i am planning to try and breast feed my baby but a few of my friends and family have advised me to buy fomula milk in before he is due just in case.

I am unsure if i do need to purchase some and what to buy that is best for my baby..

Any advice would be great



love zoe x ?o( ?o( ?o( :faint:



me - 29
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1st icsi- April 2008 - BFN
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Friday, March 5th 2010, 4:19pm

hi p. zoe

i bf last baby but my other 2 were brought up on sma gold, then sma white and finallyy sma progress. but you should buy 1 tin of sma gold, as that's the newborn formula.

or you could be really brave and not buy any and have faith in your ability to provide natures milk, and listen to all the advice your breast feeding mentors can give you.

either way, if you feel comfortable with breast or bottle your baby will pick up on that and respond accordingly. have you bought any breast cream yet. if not, the best to buy is lanisoh, it was in a purple tube (dont know about now) and it is really soothing.

good luck with your journey

xxxxx
After a long hard infertility journey, i am now reluctantly done

Bells

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Friday, March 5th 2010, 4:37pm

Ho Zoe,

It really does depend on how prepared for breastfeeding you are and how much positive support you have around you. Breastfeeding is lovely and there's nothing better for your baby BUT a lot of women are unprepared for the time, dedication and effort it can take to successfully breastfeed. It's very often the case that in the first few days a new Mum will find that her baby wishes to suck constantly at the breast (this is entirely normal and part of the physical process of getting your body to produce milk) however, to an unskilled eye it may seem that this baby is constantly hungry and therefore the Mother's milk is inadequate. Add to this that it's natural for a new baby to breastfeed constantly throughout the night, when Mum is tired and she may feel that her baby isn't settling as well as it should be. You will hear lots of stories about lack of milk production but only 1% of women cannot produce enough milk to feed their baby. In addition, it's expected that every baby born will lose up to 10% of their birthweight in the week after being born, again, this can add to the worry that baby isn't getting enough.

It's around this time that family and friends who have never been party to successful breastfeeding will encourage the Mum to 'top up' with formula and Mum will feel that her milk supply is inadequate. This often happens in the first three days when the Mother's milk hasn't even 'come in' yet, barely even giving it a chance.

So you can see that having experienced breastfeeders around you to advise what is and isn't normal will help anyone who chooses to breastfeed. If you are surrounded by people who have not breastfed, who maybe won't know what is considered normal and who will encourage you to use formula then the chances are higher that you will use formula.

In the meantime, learn as much as you possibly can about breastfeeding and what to expect. It's an art, a science and a skill, not just a case of dangling a nipple in front of a baby a few times a day. You will hear lots of bad advice and it does take total dedication but it's incredibly rewarding.

Please have a look at this thread.... Breastfeeding Basics - What to Expect





pamelag088

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4

Friday, March 5th 2010, 4:53pm

Echo all tha Bells has said(of course)
I had no formula in the house but on my 2nd night at home I sent DH out to buy some because I thought TJ was hungry after feeding more than every hour for the whole night. I was wrong.
I breastfed for 10 weeks and stopped because I was sure my milk was not enough for TJ, after being bottlefed for 5 weeks I realised he was just very tired, not hungry. Breastfeeding is hard, stressful, tiring, all you do is worry worry worry but I still look back and every second of it was worth it and wish I could have been successful and still feeding now.
Having bottles/formula in the house will make it easier to give in when times are hard but you know if you really need it and you arent managing suermarkets sell everything you would need and Im sure its not far away. My advice would be to not have any in the house, As soon as you start using it, you will end up relying on it then more formula you give, less milk you make and its a downward spiral from there.
Wish you the best of luck, be prepared for being very tired, having baby feeding constantly and be ready for non breastfeeders to make you feel like you should give a bottle, that baby is hungry, that baby should be sleepig through by now etc etc

Flic

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Saturday, March 6th 2010, 1:57pm

Hiya,

Bells is the goddess of all things pregnancy and feeding!!

I was the opposite, Tilly wouldn't suck and became ill during the first 2 days. The hospital gave us formula which she then wolfed down (after a bit of coaxing!) DH has since bought the cartons of SMA. They're ready made up and just need putting into bottles.

I tried to breastfeed and I'm so so glad I did. Even after we'd decided on formula I kept trying her on the boob. It is very emotional, I didn't realise how much I'd cry over not being able to give her my milk, but for me seeing her feeding on anything is a great relief. Its still a battle to get the bottle into her mouth!!

I'm pleased I didn't have any in though because I had to feed her and persevere and try.

I'm sure you'll be fine. Take all the support and read the link from Bells!!






Our miracle was born on 25.02.2010!!



JENSQUI

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6

Saturday, March 6th 2010, 4:05pm

Hi there. Aside from a couple of days at the beginning when we had to supplement with formula in hospital martha has been exclusively breast fed. However i have always had a tin of sma gold in the house as it made me feel happier to know that if things got tough in the middle of the night that i had a way of feeding my baby. Even when times were hard in the first couple of weeks with latching problems, constant feeding and very painful nipples i never used it ...but i guess i never panicked because i knew it was there if i needed it. I do express now but don't always find the time to do it and only keep a small amount in the freezer. It is a personal choice but if i was ill or too tired to bf and had no ebm to use i wouldn't be at all bothered about giving her the odd bottle of formula. Sorry for rambling there! X


me 38, DP 44, ttc since 2005
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Saturday, March 6th 2010, 7:26pm

I agree with what everyone else has said. I have totally breastfed my little one and have never had any formula in the house but I know that when times were hard (and there were quite a lot of those times and still are sometimes) I would have probably given up and got the formula, i'm so glad I persevered because it is such a lovely feeling when its going right. I suppose it depends what sort of person you are, if you would feel happier having some in the house get some but if like me you'd give up when what is happening is quite normal but difficult then dont, you can always pop out and get some if needs be. Good luck with what ever you decide and dont forget you are not a failure if breastfeeding is not for you xx
Cheryl
1st ICSI blessed with Aiden Reece Parkin born 01.01.10

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Sunday, March 7th 2010, 11:11am

Hi,

I think it just depends on you and your baby hun i have decided to try and breast feed but have also bought a expressing kit just incase and think i will also get some formula in as you just dont know how you or the baby will take to breastfeeding good luck with what you decide hun x
Kelly xx

mrsjasper

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Monday, March 8th 2010, 9:25am

The decision whether or not to have formula in is quite a tough one. I think its down to knowing how you think you might react after a tough night of little sleep and sore nipples. If think formula will be too easy for you to reach for when the going gets tough, then don't buy any, but if you think having it there will provide a 'safety net' and the knowledge that its there ifyou really need it then it might help keep you breastfeeding. I echo what Bells said, find out as much as you can about what to expect with breastfeeding. If you can get to a local breastfeeding group and talk to other mums who have been there and done it then you have a ready made support network. And of course there's a wealth of support and info on here.





Grace

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Monday, March 8th 2010, 7:12pm

We had the aptimil on standby which is supposed to have good bacteria in it to help the gut. It is a good idea to have a small amount available as my son was 5 weeks early and I didn't have any colostrum for him but I pumped every 3 hours for 3 days and this brought my milk in anyway. Breastfeeding is tough for the first few weeks and then it seems to miraculously get better and now I could feed him hanging upside down from the ceiling in the dark (should the need every arise). The MW's and HV's where I am seem very keen on topping up with formula even when it's not appropriate and I really had to fight my corner to get to exclusively breastfeeding, I have spoken to another mum today who is topping up and she was told by her hv that her baby had lost so much weight after birth (8%) because she wasn't producing enough milk but she's expressing after every feed to try to up her supply and she's expressing an ounce! If she can express this much after a feed then she's clearly producing enough milk and it's probably more a problem with babies latch. So my advice would be to get a good book on breastfeeding so you know what to expect (I got So That's What they are for) and get help right from the start, the mws in the hospital can get you started but you can also contact local breastfeeding support groups and Le Leche league who are all really helpful. I am so glad I stuck at it as i can feed him everywhere, don't have to take bottles and formula out and don't have to sterilise anything I just lop it out and munch :)


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roxy7

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11

Monday, March 8th 2010, 7:13pm

I'm planning on breastfeeding my babies when they arrive. I won't be buying in any formula. However, i will make sure that I have the telephone numbers of a variety of breastfeeding counsellors to hand on the days when I hit a problem. Once breastfeeding is established it's wonderful and in my experience so much easier than FF might have been. The early days can be tough though and I want to be prepared for this. This book was my bible http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nursing-Mothers-…s/dp/155832304X and it saved me from a few scrapes such as a blocked duct and engorged breasts.







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
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1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
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cs booked for 20/04/10

roxy7

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Monday, March 8th 2010, 7:20pm

Another thought - in my experience the success of breastfeeding is directly related to the number of people around you who encourage and support you, whether they're also breastfeeding mum's or others supportive of your intentions, so getting to a breastfeeding groups serves the dual purpose of getting advice and support and meeting other mums who are in a similar situation as yourself and can share your highs and lows. I don't think it's a coincidence that all but one of my large group of mum friends who all gave birth around the same time breastfed for at least the first year, with some of us getting to two years. We travelled as a pack and woe betide anyone who might have challenged us :snigger:







Me 41, DP 42
Diagnosis PCOS and old age!
DS 11/06 (clomid)
Mm/c of natural pg 03/08
1st IVF 02/09 (ectopic)
FET 08/09 :BFP:
cs booked for 20/04/10

mrsjasper

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Wednesday, March 10th 2010, 9:04am

I have spoken to another mum today who is topping up and she was told by her hv that her baby had lost so much weight after birth (8%) because she wasn't producing enough milk


This is where you need to be armed with as much info a possible before birth. Weight loss in a new born baby is normal, in fact its actually a good thing, they loose excess fluid and meconium (build up of waste products in the gut). A weight loss of up to 10% in the first week is perfectly fine in an otherwise healthy baby. A health visitor who thinks this baby needs 'topping up' with artificial feeding obviously doesn't know much about breastfeeding.





Bells

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Wednesday, March 10th 2010, 9:31am

I have spoken to another mum today who is topping up and she was told by her hv that her baby had lost so much weight after birth (8%) because she wasn't producing enough milk


A health visitor who thinks this baby needs 'topping up' with artificial feeding obviously doesn't know much about breastfeeding.


......or babies in general :rolleyes:


There's some REALLY bad advice out there for new Mums. It's frightening!





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Wednesday, March 10th 2010, 11:32am

I am planning mixed feeding and I have strated preparing for both - I have a huge heavy duty breast pump and all the trimmings as well as everything I am going to need for bottle feeding.

One tip I was given if you are planning to bottle feed is to find out what formula the hospital uses and get the same one in at home so that you don't have to make the switch.
Newly Wed

ICSI December 2008 - chemical pregnancy
ICSI May 2009 - BFN
FET September 2009 - BFP
Beautiful twin girls born 30 April 2010



Fi'smum

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Friday, March 12th 2010, 12:17am

Hi Zoe
Can I just add a little to all the great advice from Bells ---PMA !!! You're more likely to breastfeed successfully if you go into it with a postive attitude --not " I'm going to try breastfeeding but maybe I won't manege" Learn all you can about how the supply/demand syatem works, and how to recognise when your baby is latched on correctly, then say "I'm going to breastfeed"
Unfortunately the "help" given in hospitals varies, even from one midwife to another, so the more you know the better.
Fi didn't think for a minute that she would have problems. The only one was when in hospital, and Lily was feeding, and Fi felt the latch wasn't right because ti hurt, and the midwives in the ward just glanced at Lily sucking and said it was fine. It wasn't, and she had to keep trying herself till she got it right. Fortunately she got home on day 2 and I was able to give her a little help, and she's doing really well -(-see my diary) Don't know how to do links, sorry. Have faith in your body Zoe.

FZ's first ever granny diary

  • "angels&babies" is no longer a member of FZ
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Children: Annalise Joy Morrison born December 2009 from 2nd ICSI.........4 Snow Babies on ice,x

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Friday, April 9th 2010, 10:35pm

I would say have some on standby in case of emergencies.
I breastfed Annalise for 5 days and then my Mum came over to help overnight to let my husband and I sleep as I was quite unwell after the birth. She gave her Aptamil as I was unable to express enough milk for overnight at that stage.
I was mis-informed by health professionals that I couldn't carry on bf the next day and so we carried on with formula and my milk dried up. I also faced quite a bit of negativity from a small amount of family members surrounding my decision to feed Annalise myself in the first place.
After having to have the way I fell pregnant out of my control and again the birth out of my control, I felt this was one thing that I could control and it was a wonderful feeling.
About a week after, I did try to get my milk back again but it was only the slightest drop and that was it over. I feel pretty sad that I couldn't continue to have this special time with my little girl and wished things had been a bit different.
I'm sure you know already what you need to know about bf, I just wanted to share my experience as I wouldn't want anyone to feel what I did.
Having said all that, Annalise is a healthy, happy little girl,x



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bab21
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  • "angels&babies" is no longer a member of FZ
  • United Kingdom

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Children: Annalise Joy Morrison born December 2009 from 2nd ICSI.........4 Snow Babies on ice,x

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18

Friday, April 9th 2010, 10:38pm

Just to add, Chris (Fi'sMum) is absolutely right, I remember some of the midwives in the ward telling me the latch was ok and it obviously wasn't so was very very sore. I think this is a common problem judging by others I speak to on the subject,x

I also noted that this post was last written in about 4 weeks ago - silly me! Hopefully though, if anyone else is looking for similar advice, that they find all the replies in this one useful,xx



2nd ICSI March 2009 :BFP:
4 Top Grade 1 Frosties in Waiting for next time!
bab21
My Diary




This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "angels&babies" (Apr 9th 2010, 10:40pm)


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