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  • "Glitzy" started this thread

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1

Monday, December 4th 2006, 5:26pm

what do I need to buy if breastfeeding?

Hello

I intend to try hard to breastfeed my baby but obviously want to be prepared for what happens if it does not work out. I dont want to go crazy buying bottles and steralisers that I wont use - can anyone advise what is the minimum I could get away with buying just incase??

Also - if breastfeeding is there anything I need to get? I keep looking at breast pumps etc but am finding it all a little confusing.

Any help would be appreciated - am organised with everything else but not sure on the feeding side of things. Thanks xxxxxxxx


5 x ICSI b.f.n
1 x FET resulting in my gorgeous son born 2007

Rivka

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Monday, December 4th 2006, 5:37pm

To start with you don't need to buy anything at all as you have all the equipment you need. If after a short while you find you do want to try bottles then send someone to the shop!

If the equipment isn't in the house you won't have it to fall back on in times of weakness which is what I did a couple of times in the early days - got past that and happily still feeding. Worst comes to the worst the shops are what, ten minutes away, and you can get steriliser, bottles, formula whatever.

In my personal experience and I'm certain its different for everyone, the first six weeks were the hardest, really, really hard, but once I got past that there was no stopping me, so much so that I feel teary at the thought of it coming to an end some time soonish!

Good luck, I'm sure you will do great x






This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Rivka" (Dec 4th 2006, 5:38pm)


Chilli

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Monday, December 4th 2006, 5:37pm

Nursing bras & breast pads!

I got a steraliser "in case" and I only used it for the expressed milk and dummies! I got the Avent steam one and Avent ISIS breast pump, i actually broke it and ended up buying the tommee tippee one which is rubbish!

All you really need is YOU lots of water, food and rest xxxx

  • "Glitzy" started this thread

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Children: Max born March 07 - thanks to frozen embryo transfer, our little miracle

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4

Monday, December 4th 2006, 5:40pm

Thanks ladies - Rivka you made a good point - I just wory that he wont feed from me and then I will have nothing to give him. I am absolutely determind to do it though so fingers crossed baby has the same idea.

Chilli - how much were you expressing to break it lol!! I swear they look like instruments of torture those pumps - do they hurt??


5 x ICSI b.f.n
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Chilli

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Monday, December 4th 2006, 6:11pm

LOL! i dropped it whilst on the phone thought i was clever doing it one handed :rolleyes: it did survive a few more weeks but I had to hold it together!

No i don't think it hurt certainly not torture although i do agree they look scarey.

gina e

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 12:59pm

I agree with Rivka. I had absolutely nothing. Would get breast pads, the washable ones are great, what a waste to keep throwing all these things away!! I found particularly useful at night.

Yes, it's hard work, I spent 8 out of 24 hours glued to a chair, but then babies aren't commodities to fit into our lives, we should fit into theirs, or not bother having them.

Go with the flow of your baby and tell 'professionals' to **** off when they try to tell you 'oh, by now he really should be only feeding every 4 hours!' Do what your baby wants until you are comfortable and confident enough to try to establish a routine if you want. babies are not machines - they are all different, i feel very strongly abut this - Gina Ford should be burnt at the stake!!

Sorry for the lecture - it's just you will read/be told so much of what baby 'should' be doing and you are often given little credit for your own instincts. you are doing the most wonderful thing you can for your baby, well done you for being so positive.

if you do get any blips, don't give up. Just as you think their in a pattern they go and change!! Cheeky little monkeys!! Well done you, go for it!!

Saz

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 1:04pm

Again, absolutely nothing except breastpads!!!

I admit tho I did get an Avent BF starter pack. This had 6 bottles, 2 feeder cups, steriliser, pump, some milk containers, a couple of dummies and a trial pack of pads. It was about £50 and I have used it loadds of times now.

Binky

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 3:11pm

I would actually say to invest in a few very very good BF bras, they were my saviour, and get lanisol nipple cream in, it is expensive but works a treat. Don't go for cheap breast pads either as I did in the beginning and had to use 2 at once.

I would, like the others have said buy a steriliser and leave the bottles out and if you get desperate then send someone for a few.

Keep with it, it is very difficult in the early weeks.

Good Luck Jox

Torisen

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 6:54pm

Lanosil lanohsil or what is it called for the nipples ? The purple lanolin cream...
I have heard that camilosan is contributing to peanut allergies in babies since it contains groundnut oil...

When I got desperate I used gelonet, it works wonders on nips!

Even if you think that you don't need to put anything on them, do moisturise them... I ended up looking like someone stabbed me and large chunks of nipple and scab came off then I was feeding... so do keep moisturising them!!! :D
ICSI Jan 2006 - BFP
MC one twin at 6 weeks
DS born in Oct 2006
BF DS 10 months 3 weeks and 5 days
FET 11/07, ICSI 12/07 (ABANDONED), ICSI 2/08, IUI 5/08 - BFN
Clomid IUI 7/08 BFP MC a twin... again :(


Rivka

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 7:00pm

Quoted

Originally posted by Libbygrace
I would actually say to invest in a few very very good BF bras, they were my saviour, and get lanisol nipple cream in, it is expensive but works a treat. Don't go for cheap breast pads either as I did in the beginning and had to use 2 at once.


You can get Lansinoh prescribed by your midwife in the early days. And definitely don't buy cheap breast pads, I used some I was given and they stuck to my nipples and caused sores. I do rec the washable ones, as Gina says its an awful lot of waste, and there no trouble to look after.







  • "Glitzy" started this thread

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Reg: Oct 4th 2005

Location: Scotland

Children: Max born March 07 - thanks to frozen embryo transfer, our little miracle

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 7:13pm

Excellent - thank you. Where do I buy the pads from and how many should I buy? I have a breastfeeding workshop in January so I will probably get some tips from there. I done my birth plan this week and its the only thing I have really asked for is that he is put right on me as soon as he comes out for skin to skin and a potential feed - I hear the sooner you do it the easier baby takes to it - is that true?? Its something that I really want to get right as I would be so disapointed if I could not do it so any tips would be much appreciated. DH keeps looking at my ever growing boobs saying they wont fit in baby's mouth lol!!! xxxx


ohh editin to ask - how do i know what size to buy the bras in as I presume I will be bigger when the milk comes in after birth??


5 x ICSI b.f.n
1 x FET resulting in my gorgeous son born 2007

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Glitzy" (Dec 5th 2006, 7:14pm)


mrsjasper

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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 7:15pm

The only things I would add to what the others have said is that you should read up on why and how to BF now while you have time. As others have said it is hard in the early weeks. Whilst I must stress that the problems Tink and I have been having are not the norm, they do happen and if you are not motivated (and stubborn) it is very easy to decide its to hard and switch completely to formula. The only reason I am still expressing (as I type) is because I had lots of information from various sources that made me realise how important it is to give my baby breast milk.
Edited to say read stuff from reliable sources such as NCT & La Leche.

The other thing you need is to plan how you can delegate everything else so that you can focus your attention solely on breastfeeding for several weeks if necessary. Make sure DH can work the washing machine or get your mum or someone else to do the washing and ironing, fill the freezer, learn to shop online... I was lucky with my MIL, she did the washing and ironing for 5 weeks for me and still comes round and runs the hoover round for me.




This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "mrsjasper" (Dec 5th 2006, 7:17pm)


  • "Glitzy" started this thread

Posts: 3,006

Reg: Oct 4th 2005

Location: Scotland

Children: Max born March 07 - thanks to frozen embryo transfer, our little miracle

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13

Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 7:24pm

Thanks Mrs J. Its only from reading about some of your experiences on here that I have realised just how hard bf can be. I stupidly thought that you put your boob in the babies mouth and hey presto - obviously not! I will have a read on the nct site - thanks for the tip xxx


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Tuesday, December 5th 2006, 8:23pm

I agree with Mrs J - just devote all your energy and time to feeding your little one - but hormones and mother nature will ensure that you do that anyway - it'll be just you and your baby in your own little bubble :D. One of the best tips I had was from Bells... when you get home spend the first week tucked up in bed with your litltle one, skin to skin (but I'd put a nappy on little one!). Get daddy to feed you snacks, chocolate and goodies - best thing for getting your milk supply up to speed and in tune with what your baby wants. Ohh I'm getting all emotional again ;(. As far as pads go I got through tons - had to change them throughout the day in the first month until things all settle down but don't worry about buying loads of washable ones as, if your baby is anything like my DD, you'll be washing almost every day anyway :rolleyes: Also put Lansinohl on your pads as well as on you - stops the pad sticking to you.



Rivka

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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 9:04am

Quoted

Originally posted by Glitzy
I hear the sooner you do it the easier baby takes to it - is that true?? Its something that I really want to get right as I would be so disapointed if I could not do it so any tips would be much appreciated.


This is true but don't worry if things don't go quite as you planned. I had to leave my baby for two hours almost straight after birth to have her placenta manually removed. I did then have some problems getting her to feed in the first few weeks, partly because the midwives gave her formula without my consent. I stuck with it and eventually we both got the hang of it and boy was it worth it!

I've for four sets of washable pads and founf that to be enough. stuck the lot in the wash at the end of each day.






This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Rivka" (Dec 6th 2006, 9:05am)


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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 1:49pm

Hi Glitzy

Your birth plan sounds similar to mine. For both my births, I asked for the baby to be put on my tummy while the cord was still attached. Bit tricky, seeing as I gave birth standing up for one and kneeling for the other, but one midwife holds the baby and one helps you get comfortable! I agree it's all really important, but don't panic if you don't breastfeed within one minute of giving birth. Babies are generally alert for a couple of hours after birth, giving them time to gaze at their mother (and father) to fix their faces in their brain. With both of mine, we probably just looked at each other for half an hour, then I offered the boob, then a bit more gazing, then he fell asleep. Just make sure you try your first bf in those first two hours, and the more skin-to-skin generally, the better.

Oh, one other thing, don't worry unduly if your baby doesn't get the hang of sucking the nipple that first time - it can take a while for them to get the hang of it. You and the baby are both learning. My first DS took a couple of days to get the idea, but DS2 took one look and sucked hard. I got such a shock! 8o

It's easily the most amazing two hours of your life, and I'm privileged to have been through it twice!

Breastpads - I used resuables as they're so easy to wash if you're washing every day anyway. Even if you're bf'ing, you may want two or three bottles so that you can express milk for your DH/DP to give a feed. You'll therefore also need a steriliser and a pump. Believe me, if your DH can give a bottle of expressed milk and you can get an early night, you'll feel a whole lot more sane the next day! Stick to bf for the first couple of weeks so that your baby thinks that the nipple is best.
Had a total of three fresh IVF cycles and three frozen transfers (embryos and blastocysts)
m/c @ 11 weeks in 2007 DS1 and DS2 born from fresh IVF cycles :D
:D

Torisen

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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 2:30pm

I bought a cheepish glider chair from glasgow pram centre... it is great for the nighttime feeds!
ICSI Jan 2006 - BFP
MC one twin at 6 weeks
DS born in Oct 2006
BF DS 10 months 3 weeks and 5 days
FET 11/07, ICSI 12/07 (ABANDONED), ICSI 2/08, IUI 5/08 - BFN
Clomid IUI 7/08 BFP MC a twin... again :(


Saz

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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 2:44pm

I would second that!! I love my glider chair for feeding!

Rivka

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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 3:21pm

If you can't afford a special chair for feeding get yourself two or three good firm cushions / pillows to stuff down behind you. i got a couple of long thin ones from Ikea for £3 each, they are great lumber support and can be squashed into your under pram basket for when you're out and about - I couldn't have done wihtout them when I was first getting the hang of things.

Also instead of buying the special bfing pillows which can cost £20-30 I got one of those V-shaped pillows meant for reading in bed - it cost £8 and has been really good.







  • "Glitzy" started this thread

Posts: 3,006

Reg: Oct 4th 2005

Location: Scotland

Children: Max born March 07 - thanks to frozen embryo transfer, our little miracle

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Wednesday, December 6th 2006, 7:37pm

wow thanks everyone. I bought a breastfeeding pillow - other than that i did not have a clue where to start. I have a rocking chair already but not sure it will be overly comfy for long periods of sitting. This is something I really want to get right so keep the advice coming. If my son is anything like his dad he will feed constantly!!! (not that dh gets his from my booby lol!!)


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gina e

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Thursday, December 7th 2006, 9:23pm

Water!!! Just remembered - if you are likely to feed in different places, have bottles of water lying around the place. I often found myself settled down and then 'Oh no - where's my water?!' Somehow it seemed like such a chore to dh to keep going to get one (poor old men!!) so next time I'll try to be more organised.

Oh yeh, depends what you're like but I was starving constantly and as a winter baby had a horlicks and 2 crumpets every middle of the night for weeks!! Just a thought!

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Tuesday, December 19th 2006, 10:13am

i pre bought my bottles and sterlizer and i am glad i did.
i wasnt producing enough milk and went on to formual feed and top up with breast at night, which works well for us. i love my night time cuddles, and now she wakes at lot less and gets a good 4oz down her at 11pm.







mrsjasper

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Thursday, January 18th 2007, 8:18am

Wanted to add some more tips to this thread. If your baby is full term and healthy DO NOT let anyone do blood sugar heel prick test without getting specialist advice. If the midwives want to do it, insist that you see a specialist breastfeeding advisor first, if they don't have one, phone the NCT or LA Leche. Apparently this heel prick and topping up with formula is very common practice and theres no good medical evidence to support it. If your baby is feeding frequently (for that read continuously) and you have had 1/2 hours sleep all night, I'm afraid thats whats supposed to happen and it doesn't mean your baby is starving (it gets easier). If I'd known this I don't think Moll would have had so many problems latching on and I think I would still be breastfeeding now.





Rene

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Thursday, January 18th 2007, 6:44pm

There is 100% no reason for a top-up feed even if baby's blood sugar is low. A few drops of colostrum will rectify this problem (has anyone tasted it - it as sweet as syrup). Most hospitals down here do not even stock bottles and formula - if you want to use them you need to bring your own in from day one - so if the baby's blood sugar is low they express your colostrum and spoon feed it to baby and that only if they really can't get baby to latch on. If baby is sickly then it is an entirely different kettle of fish, baby will get some glucose through a drip or a tube that is passed into his/her stomach via the nose and even that only on the orders of the paediatrician.


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Friday, January 19th 2007, 11:57am

ditto - here in SEAsia, the hospitals dont have formula or bottles or sterilisers - only artificial fluid that goes into a baby would be through an iv drip.

i was separated after my c-section from DS for over an hour and a half whilst they removed the placenta, cleaned the calcification that had occurred, and removed the endometritus, sewed me up, raised my body temperature back to normal and took me back to the ward. they didnt feed DS. they kept an eye on him for the next few days - he had no jaundice and his soft spot wasnt sunken, and checked when he was doing bowel movements and urinating. I had trouble feeding him - he had a tiny tiny mouth and I had tiny inverted nipples, but even though I had cracked and open wounds and sometimes he would mis-latch and give me baby hickies on the aureolae and they showed me how to express by hand so that I could spoon feed him to save my nipples and showed me how to put colostrum on the wounds to help them heal. they really helped. they helped when I was crying in tears and within minutes of giving up and i went back to them and they helped me latch DS on properly, gave me some lansinoh and lots and lots of encouragement.

my one major piece of advice would be: do NOT listen to anyone that tells you to give up in those first few tough weeks - do NOT buy any sterilisers, bottles, teats, formula, breast-pump for the first few weeks - find out now before the birth how to contact your nearest breast feeding support group (apart from the ladies here) - remember, it is rarely as easy as people con you into, but your baby will thank you for doing so by the huge smile he/she will give you after a great feed :]




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